Home » Uncategorized » Theology & Vulnerability (Or, Beginning Again)

Theology & Vulnerability (Or, Beginning Again)

I embarked on a new adventure with the start of the school year: I am now a “TA,” or Teaching Assistant, for an undergraduate theology class at Boston College.  After a couple weeks on the job I have greater insight into some of teaching’s challenges, but I also have a greater sense of the immense joy that teaching can bring.  For instance, the comments of our students fascinate me, leaving my mind spinning with thoughts every time I depart from a class discussion or grading session.

Since early last week I’ve been circling around an observation one student voiced in class. We had spent the hour unpacking the first chapter of Tillich’s Dynamics of Faith, which includes his argument that doubt is an essential component of faith. The professor asked whether religious communities are typically places where doubt is welcome, and unsurprisingly, most students replied in the negative.  It was the phrasing of one student’s response that struck me in particular. She explained that she grew up Catholic and never felt like she could express her doubts about faith and God.  Because she felt that her sincere doubts were unwelcome in the community, she often felt quite lonely.

This immediately stirred a mix of emotions in me. I empathized with this student, remembering the acute spiritual loneliness I experienced when I showed up to my first theology class as a freshman in college.  Somehow I had also internalized this message that I was strange, even bad, because I couldn’t shake the personal doubts and intellectual questions that I brought to Catholicism. I was sad to hear that, all these years later, another young adult sits in a theology class feeling like I did, as if very little separated her experience of Catholicism and mine.

Meanwhile, I was hopeful and excited for this student. It was precisely the study of theology that dissolved so much of my spiritual loneliness. In theology I found a space where inquiry brought people together—a stark contrast to the feeling of isolation that doubt had engendered previously.  Consequently, theology was from the first a space of immense vulnerability.  The theological classroom was a space where I disclosed and engaged my “ultimate concern” in life—that which, according to Tillich, is the site of our finite encounter with the infinite.  To question and doubt that which is most dear to us necessitates risk, and I was fortunate to experience the theological classroom as a safe space for such risk.

As the years passed, however, I have increasingly doubted whether theology is actually a safe space to explore and question what matters to me most. There are many reasons for this.  It is due in part to the appropriate loss of naivety that has accompanied my advancement in the theological academy.  Theology does not appear as romantic as it used to, and that’s probably a good thing. However, over the past year I’ve concluded that I’m often afraid to risk my questions and ideas in theology for a host of reasons that aren’t so good.  Some of these inhibitions are purely internal to my psyche. Some are external.  In the end, they are all inhabitations—factors that have, overtime, restricted my ability pursue my theological vocation courageously and with my whole heart.

In the next few days and weeks I plan to share about these inhibitions through some reflections on theology, fear, and vulnerability here on the blog.  For many who have been a part of my everyday life during the past year, many of the forthcoming reflections will be familiar.  I’ve decided to share them with everyone else here on the blog in light of what this student reminded me of earlier this week.  One of the great lessons of my theological formation is that we are not alone as creatures in this world.  When I look back on the past nine years I have never regretted the times when I reached out of the loneliness I experienced to be vulnerable and share openly about my struggles, doubts, and questions.  So far, this vulnerability has  been received with the confirmation that we are, in fact, not alone.

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3 Comments

  1. BABJacobs says:

    I think it is really wonderful and brave that you’re doing this. I look forward to reading and being provoked, our deepest questions and problems have to be at the fore. xoxox

  2. Jessica, you have touched a nerve in me today – in the best way. Looking forward to what’s next and sending you many prayers. Thank you.

  3. […] this week I recalled how my early encounters with academic theology led me to view it as a space for vulnerability and […]

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