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Unapologetic (Theology & Vulnerability IV)

I’ve been blogging here about “theology and vulnerability”—that is, about my heightened struggles with anxiety during the past year and my discernment about the relationship between who I am as a doctoral student in theology and as someone who struggles with mental health.  In my last post I highlighted the unhealthy ways that many appear to respond to the anxiety-producing structures of the theological academy.  I promised to finish up my little series with a few observations about those who cope better, and even thrive, in this environment. From them I’ve garnered some challenging lessons that I carry with me as I continue to face the difficulties of my vocational journey.

A week or so after I started my Master’s degree, I was given some of the best advice about graduate school that I have received to date.  I had confessed to one of my mentors, Tom Beaudoin, that the perceived pressures and expectations of Harvard had already left me bewildered and concerned.  So quickly I had felt my anxiety rise and encroach upon my love of theology, my intellectual curiosity, and my discernment about a vocational calling to theology.  I sought reassurance from Tom, asking, “Will I cut it?  What do they want?  What should I be doing?”

He told me many things, all of which have been condensed into a single word of wisdom that has echoed in my mind for years. “Don’t apologize to anyone for how you choose to engage this experience.” It is only during the past year that I became truly attuned to the truth of his advice. Essentially, he advised me to be myself—freely, contentedly, unapologetically.  He had the insight to know that if I was able to be myself, to become more comfortable with my own unique ability and style in theology—and in life more broadly—then these anxious questions and worries about external expectations would fade a bit.

While engaging the world as one’s self, one’s true self, may seem like it would be the most natural thing to do, I’ve often found it to be incredibly difficult.  It is difficult, I think, because I have internalized so many other messages that promise peace and happiness in exchange for being someone other than who I really am.  (e.g., “Smile less, or you won’t be taken seriously.”  “Don’t write about this scholar, or that subject, because people will pigeon-hole you, tokenize you, even dismiss you without consideration.” “Wear heals when you teach. The sound and height will intimidate students so they don’t disrespect you as just another young woman.”).  Many of these messages are not untrue, and many who pass them along do so with the very best intention of promoting my well-being.

Perhaps I would be taken more seriously if I smiled less, wore high-heels, and withheld or postponed my perspective about certain subjects.  But I wouldn’t be me.  I wouldn’t be me, and I would have a head full of worries about who I ought to be at any given moment of every single day. A head full of worries about “what ‘they’ want” and “whether I’m cutting it” and “who I should be” has much less room for theological reflection and creativity. I know from experience.

The professors and peers who seem to love life in theology, who thrive despite the pressures and demanding structures of the academy, are those who are not consumed by who they ought to be as professional or aspiring theologians. This requires an immense amount of vulnerability.  To come to theology as one’s self, unapologetically, may at times mean doing what seems unorthodox or unpopular to others.  Likewise, not playing by the standard rules and strategies and timelines of the academy may lead some to be less “successful” or “accomplished” by certain standards.  This risks painful rejection, too. Some of us will be rejected, at times unfairly, for being our true selves.  This is the tremendous risk and vulnerability of bringing one’s true self to theology—or any vocation, for that matter.

My struggles with anxiety have brought me to a point where I simply can’t proceed in theology if I do it any other way than as myself.  If being myself, unapologetically, allows me a sense of integrity about what I do—if it allows me to free up the headspace to think boldly and authentically and creatively, if it allows me to be content today rather than endlessly chasing after the promise of my future status in the profession—then the professional risks are worthwhile to me.

This remains terrifying at times. There are still days when my voice shakes violently as I force myself to speak in class.  There are days when I belabor paragraphs or essay titles more out of fear than interest. There are days when I hesitate, anxiously, before clicking the “publish” key and letting my words take on a virtual life of their own.  I am a bit more content than I used to be, however. More frequently than in the past, I face these situations as myself.  A bit more courageous, a little more unapologetic.

And surprisingly, I’ve often discovered that things are not as frightening as I imagined they would be.  I’ve brought my smile, given away my high heels, and spoken up and written about what matters to me most.  And it’s been hard, but a bit more satisfying.

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2 Comments

  1. Pat Sykora says:

    Ah, Jessica….thank you for this beautiful and vulnerable piece. I first read you 4 years ago when I moved to the Boston area and it was “love at first write”! I said to myself, “Now there’s someone to watch- she’s real and brilliant, I hope the system doesn’t shred her!” I remember really wanting to meet you and the day we had lunch at BC two summers ago filled me with joy and hope. Yes! You are exactly what the field needs more of. And Jessica, it’s ok to wear heels….

  2. jaisyjoseph says:

    yes, yes, a million times yes 🙂

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